Tech Law Policy Blog Tracking the Most Important Research and Developments in Tech Law & Policy

TagSilicon Valley Animus

Friday Links 4/12/19

F

I’m going to have to start posting these links more than once a week if I want to keep up with all the bad EU tech regulations coming out. Here’s Mike Masnick of TechDirt providing a blow-by-blow of the new EU terrorist regulation. This new law requires all sites, anywhere in the world, regardless of how small or lacking in resources, to take down all objectionable content within one hour or face...

Friday Links 4/5/19

F

Perhaps the smartest thinker on tech policy issues right now is a non-politician, non-regulator, and a non-lawyer. Here’s Ben Thompson’s missive this week on Mark Zuckerberg’s op-ed in the Washington Post and how it relates to the EU’s new copyright directive. I truly could not have said it better myself. Here’s the original op-ed from Zuckerberg, for context. From a PR perspective, Zuckerberg is...

Friday Links 3/29/19

F

The big news in tech policy this week: The European Union signed off on its proposed “link tax” and revised copyright regime. In essence, if the law goes into effect, any company with more than 50 employees or €10 million in annual revenue would have to negotiate a license with a content provider before providing any links to copyrighted content. Given that the nature of internet linking is very...

Friday Links 3/15/19

F

Big news in tech law policy this week: In a 1700-word blog post, Elizabeth Warren proposes to break up Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google. An economist responds. Ben Thompson provides another excellent analysis. The intellectual justification for these changes seem to be loosely based on the ideologies of Tim Wu and Lina Khan, both of whom are very intelligent and capable scholars. But the...

Friday Links 3/8/19

F

[I]n an information-rich world, the wealth of information means a dearth of something else: a scarcity of whatever it is that information consumes. What information consumes is rather obvious: it consumes the attention of its recipients. Hence a wealth of information creates a poverty of attention and a need to allocate that attention efficiently among the overabundance of information sources...

Friday Links 3/1/19

F

Tyler Cowen expresses skepticism about the Green New Deal and Medicare for All. But he also predicts sea changes in the regulatory burden for major tech companies over the coming years. Not exactly a Tetlockian prediction in terms of precision, but worth noting from someone of Cowen’s stature. New article about robot liability coming out soon from Bryan Casey of Stanford Law School. Love the...

Friday Links 2/15/19

F

One of the many reasons I’m skeptical that self-driving cars will take over the road any time soon: Many people really don’t seem to like the idea. Smart contracts: Neither smart nor contracts, from Freedom to Tinker. Related, a new James Grimmelmann paper on the ambiguity inherent in smart contracts. This is an excellent paper, and I had a brief back-and-forth with the author on beefing up the...

Tech Law Policy Blog Tracking the Most Important Research and Developments in Tech Law & Policy

Recent Posts

Recent Comments

Categories