Tech Law Policy Blog Tracking the Most Important Research and Developments in Tech Law & Policy

TagAntitrust

Friday Links: 50 Ways to Draft a Privacy Law

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States are tripping over themselves to pass ever-stricter privacy laws. Texas just signed a new data breach notification law. Nevada and Oregon also have expanded their privacy laws. Nevada’s law includes a right to opt out of the sale of personal data, which is the first such law in the United States. Maine passed a new law that may be stricter still, one that requires ISPs to receive...

Friday Links: Moar Disinformation

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How Taiwan is trying to combat disinformation without “censorship.” What they try to do is monitor social media, spot disinformation early on, and then launch a government counter-narrative to combat the disinformation. It’s an interesting idea, but the Digital Minister acknowledges that, “[t]ruth to be told, it is actually very exhausting.” I suspect this would be difficult if not impossible to...

Friday Links: The Right to a Well-Calibrated Machine Decision?

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An excellent forthcoming paper by Aziz Huq breaks down the various weaknesses in the increasingly common demand for a “right to a human decision.” Huq analyzes the many arguments in favor of obligatory human decision-making processes and concludes by suggesting that we’d be better off working toward a higher standard of machine decisions. Within the paper, Huq does an excellent job dissecting the...

Friday Links 3/29/19

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The big news in tech policy this week: The European Union signed off on its proposed “link tax” and revised copyright regime. In essence, if the law goes into effect, any company with more than 50 employees or €10 million in annual revenue would have to negotiate a license with a content provider before providing any links to copyrighted content. Given that the nature of internet linking is very...

Friday Links 3/22/19

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Miranda Perry Fleischer and Daniel Hemel are coming out with a new article on the architecture of basic income. This article does an excellent job explaining the arguments and counterarguments related to Universal Basic Income, as well as providing a proposal for how such a program might be implemented here. I’m deeply skeptical because of UBI for three reasons. First, given the scope and cost of...

Friday Links 3/8/19

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[I]n an information-rich world, the wealth of information means a dearth of something else: a scarcity of whatever it is that information consumes. What information consumes is rather obvious: it consumes the attention of its recipients. Hence a wealth of information creates a poverty of attention and a need to allocate that attention efficiently among the overabundance of information sources...

Friday Links 2/22/19

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Orin Kerr on whether we should pass a “deep fakes” law.  Or, to be more precise, whether the current language of Ben Sasse’s federal “deep fakes” proposal is a good idea. New Larry Solum article on artificially intelligent systems. Excellent. New study on AI, algorithmic pricing, and collusion. The collusion that we find is typically partial – the algorithms do not converge to the monopoly...

Friday Links 2/15/19

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One of the many reasons I’m skeptical that self-driving cars will take over the road any time soon: Many people really don’t seem to like the idea. Smart contracts: Neither smart nor contracts, from Freedom to Tinker. Related, a new James Grimmelmann paper on the ambiguity inherent in smart contracts. This is an excellent paper, and I had a brief back-and-forth with the author on beefing up the...

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