Tech Law Policy Blog Tracking the Most Important Developments and Research in Tech Law & Policy

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Friday Links 3/8/19

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[I]n an information-rich world, the wealth of information means a dearth of something else: a scarcity of whatever it is that information consumes. What information consumes is rather obvious: it consumes the attention of its recipients. Hence a wealth of information creates a poverty of attention and a need to allocate that attention efficiently among the overabundance of information sources...

Friday Links 3/1/19

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Tyler Cowen expresses skepticism about the Green New Deal and Medicare for All. But he also predicts sea changes in the regulatory burden for major tech companies over the coming years. Not exactly a Tetlockian prediction in terms of precision, but worth noting from someone of Cowen’s stature. New article about robot liability coming out soon from Bryan Casey of Stanford Law School. Love the...

Friday Links 2/22/19

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Orin Kerr on whether we should pass a “deep fakes” law.  Or, to be more precise, whether the current language of Ben Sasse’s federal “deep fakes” proposal is a good idea. New Larry Solum article on artificially intelligent systems. Excellent. New study on AI, algorithmic pricing, and collusion. The collusion that we find is typically partial – the algorithms do not converge to the monopoly...

Friday Links 2/15/19

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One of the many reasons I’m skeptical that self-driving cars will take over the road any time soon: Many people really don’t seem to like the idea. Smart contracts: Neither smart nor contracts, from Freedom to Tinker. Related, a new James Grimmelmann paper on the ambiguity inherent in smart contracts. This is an excellent paper, and I had a brief back-and-forth with the author on beefing up the...

Tech Law Policy Blog Tracking the Most Important Developments and Research in Tech Law & Policy

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